Earth Girl Helen Brown (Record Release), Jack Name's Fictional Boys, LFZ, EARTH DAY!!

Earth Girl Helen Brown (Record Release), Jack Name's Fictional Boys, LFZ, EARTH DAY!!

Sun · April 22, 2018

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$0.00

This event is 21 and over

Earth Girl Helen Brown
Earth Girl Helen Brown
In the spring of 2017, West Coast indie stalwart Heidi Alexander (the Sandwitches, Pruno Truman), began issuing a series of highly collaborative, cosmically inclined EPs under the multiloquent title Earth Girl Helen Brown Center for Planetary Intelligence Band. Reviving a character first coined in 2010 by musician Sonny Smith from his ambitious 100 Records project, Alexander sought to cast Earth Girl Helen Brown in a similar group spirit, gathering together a variety of musical colleagues from the L.A. and Bay Area indie scenes to create recordings loosely themed around the planets of our solar system. Arriving seasonally on limited-edition cassettes, Mercury marked her first entry in the series, followed later that summer by Mars. Saturn closed out 2017 with Venus landing in the winter of 2018. In addition to providing a fun musical cross-pollination and creative logistical challenge, another aspect of this project was altruistic, with proceeds from the releases being donated to a variety of environmental causes. Across the four EPs, a cast of over 40 players including Ty Segall, Jon Dwyer, Shannon Lay, Emilee Booher, and Mikal Cronin joined Alexander on songs that mix spacy jazz, indie pop, folk, and eccentric lo-fi wanderings. Featuring ten tracks culled from those EPs, the full-length Four Satelittes, Vol. 1 offers a more concise overview of the project and a look into Earth Girl Helen Brown's zany vision. Sometimes warm and breezy, like the sunshine pop of "Earth Elevator," sometimes cerebral and psychedelic like the 12-minute "Oh! What a War," Four Satelittes plays more like an anthology than a well-sequenced record, though its unpredictability is a part of its charm. Overall, there's a lot to like and Alexander's many talents as a writer, singer, multi-instrumentalist, and team leader are evident.
Jack Name's Fictional Boys
Jack Name's Fictional Boys
Name’s previous projects— one under the name John Webster Johns issued by Attacknine Records and a handful of independently released recordings under other names—have earned him a reputation as a musician’s musician. Name is also touring guitarist for White Fence aka Tim Presley, who recently told Pitchfork he prefers L.A. to San Francisco. Name took some time away from preparing for his Light Show tour to talk about music, anti-identity, and battling the woolly bullies of the world.

❶ Workaday drudgery inspired Name, who was born in Copenhagen, Denmark and grew up in Los Angeles, to pursue a life as a musician. “I never had a moment where I knew that was what I was going to do,” he says. “I just had a feeling that that’s the species I am. Music is a make-believe world that appeals to me.”

❷ Name is as enigmatic in person as he is onstage. Although he usually performs with only one other musician and a pre-programmed backing track, he has appeared with everything from big brass bands to conventional rock quartets.

❸ Most of Light Show’s compositions are driven by a twangy ’60s guitar sound. Tracks vacillate between grand synth-weaved psychedelic tapestries and Ariel Pink-esque lo-fi garage rock with screeching vocals. Name describes it as “fictional rock ‘n roll.”

❹ Name has performed his material under several different names—Muzz, Fictional Boys, and now Jack Name—but they’re not structured personas à la David Bowie’s Ziggy Stardust. “They’re just different names. It’s all the same thing,” he says. “I’m sort of anti-identity,” he says. “Sometimes I’ll dress in drag for a couple of weeks, but then I’ll shave my head and wear the same clothes for three months afterwards or something like that. I like the idea of destroying identity. The name thing is part of that, too. We’re all the same underneath it all anyway.”

❺ Nonconformity is a central theme in Name’s work, one that permeates the lyrics of Light Show, an album in defense of children who are labeled as misfits. The overarching narrative depicts a battle between “shadows,” or troubled children, and the “woolly bullies” who oppress them. “I have a problem with the way kids are put on drugs for educational purposes,” Name explains. “I’ve always questioned the whole idea of ‘chemical imbalance,’ because I don’t think there’s anything wrong with those kids. There’s something wrong with the world.”

❻ When asked about his Angeleno upbringing, Name muses, “There’s something about L.A. that looks a lot like Dr. Seuss books to me. The nature has an alien quality. It’s a really good place for make-believe.”
LFZ
LFZ
LFZ is the current musical endeavor of Sean Smith. Guitar is at the heart and synthesizers come into play at times, all manipulated by a vast array of analog and digital devices. The music is emotionally driven and rides the line between composition and improvisation. There is a deep experimentalism captured in the music of LFZ -all executed by tangible means. LFZ is exploratory of sights, sounds and the phenomenological.

The first album from LFZ is two extended pieces for guitar and electronics. As with all of Smith's work, the music is instrumental but refers heavily to personal subject matter and concepts. It was composed, improvised, and recorded at the end of a decade long residence in San Francisco, during a time of transition and deep self reflection around the death of his father. "Fair Winds & Following Seas," a multi-movement composition, is an abstract journey through the intangible phenomena of life and void, nature and spirit. The completely improvised b-side, "Infinite Regress," delves colder depths by way of repetition and random chaos. Both pieces, almost opposite in approach compliment each other to form a cohesive whole.
Venue Information:
Zebulon
2478 N Fletcher Dr
Los Angeles, CA, 90039
http://zebulon.la/