Screening of "Shock Values" - A collection of shorts from the late 60s by Masters of Horror, such as John Carpenter, while they were students at USC

USC’s Industry Relations presents

Screening of "Shock Values" - A collection of shorts from the late 60s by Masters of Horror, such as John Carpenter, while they were students at USC

Tue · October 30, 2018

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$0.00

Blood Bath (1969 /1976, written and directed by Dan O’Bannon) Red tint (original 16mm blown up to 35mm) A slovenly young man commits suicide out of boredom.

The Demon (1970, written and directed by Charles Adair) B/W (original 16mm). A woman left alone in a desert home begins to feel she is being watched.

Good Morning Dan (1968, written and directed by Dan O’Bannon camera by John Carpenter). Set in what was then the distant future of 2006, an old man reminisces on his days back at USC.

Captain Voyeur (1969, written and directed by John Carpenter). A dull office worker transforms into a costumed peeping tom at night

Lady Madonna (1970, written and directed by John Carpenter) – brief excerpt of the audio since only the sound currently exists.

Judson’s Release (1971, written by Alec Lorimore, Directed by Terence Winkless). A young man returns to a small town and begins to torment a girl who is babysitting a little boy.

Shock Values
Shock Values
In a fascinating feature-length horror anthology, Shock Value: The Movie—How Dan O’Bannon and Some USC Outsiders Helped Invent Modern Horror, archivist Dino Everett proves that USC students O’Bannon, John Carpenter and others began redefining the horror genre while at the School of Cinematic Arts in the 1970s.

Using New York Times writer Jason Zinoman’s book Shock Value as inspiration, USC Hugh M. Hefner Moving Image Archive archivist Dino Everett assembled a feature-length compilation of SCA student works from the late ’60s and ’70s entitled Shock Value: The Movie—How Dan O’Bannon and Some USC Outsiders Helped Invent Modern Horror. The compilation features recently uncovered and previously unseen student films by O’Bannon (Alien, Total Recall) and John Carpenter (Halloween, Escape from New York)—including their very first pairing in 1968, Good Morning Dan! Along with Carpenter’s Captain Voyeur and O’Bannon’s Blood Bath, a film which cemented Carpenter’s desire to work with O’Bannon outside of film school (see Carpenter interview in 1980 issue of Cinemafantastique -Vol 10 no. 1 pg 9-). In addition, films by their classmates Terry Winkless (Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, The Nest), Alec Lorimore (an Oscar- nominated documentary producer) and Charles Adair’s (Bleeders) zombie film The Demon, to show how USC was a major birthplace for the redefining of the horror genre in the 1970s.
The crown jewel of the program is a short by Winkless and Lorimore and starring O’Bannon entitled Judson's Release. Made in 1970, Judson’s Release is the blueprint for films such as Halloween, Black Christmas, He Knows You’re Alone and countless others, and O’Bannon’s relentless and emotionless portrayal of the killer foreshadows Jason, Michael Myers and many other film killers who would follow.
Everett likens it to watching Keith Richards learn how to play guitar, “There are moments of brilliance coupled with moments that remind us these legends were still learning. Even in a dark comedy like Captain Voyeur you can see shots resembling the horror to be found in his later films”
Venue Information:
Zebulon
2478 N Fletcher Dr
Los Angeles, CA, 90039
http://zebulon.la/